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Dunedin Chinese Garden (Levels 3–4)

The unit also provides an approach for other Asia-related EOTC that teachers may be looking at developing for their students.

This unit of work encourages students to explore the Dunedin Chinese Garden and discover its significance to the people of Dunedin. Students will use an inquiry approach to develop their understandings.

Approximate duration of unit: 3–6 lessons

Teaching and learning chapters

Big idea: 'What is the purpose of the Dunedin Chinese Garden?’

Further inquiry

 

 

Achievement objectives

Key concepts

Conceptual understandings/learning intentions

Students will …

Level 3

Social sciences 

Students will gain knowledge, skills, and experiences to:

  • understand how people remember and record the past in different ways.

Visual Arts

Students will:

  • investigate the purpose of objects and images from past and present cultures and identify the contexts in which they were or are made, viewed, and valued
  • describe the ideas their own and others’ objects and images communicate.

Cultural expressions

Describe why and when the Chinese came to New Zealand. Explain why the Chinese Garden is important to the people of Dunedin and New Zealand.

Investigate the key symbolic aspects of the Chinese Garden and construct their own representation of the garden.

Justify their inclusion of specific objects in their representation.

Level 4

Social sciences

Students will gain knowledge, skills, and experiences to:

  • understand how people pass on and sustain culture and heritage for different reasons and why this has consequences for people
  • understand how exploration and innovation create opportunities and challenges for people, places, and environments.

Visual arts

Students will:

  • investigate the purpose of objects and images from past and present cultures and identify the contexts in which they were or are made, viewed, and valued
  • explore and describe ways in which meanings can be communicated and interpreted in their own and others' work.
 

Describe features of the garden and their significance to the Chinese culture. Explain how the Chinese influenced New Zealand, and the influence New Zealand has had on the Chinese living here.

Identify the opportunities and challenges faced in the building of the Chinese Garden.

Investigate the key symbolic aspects of the Chinese Garden and construct their own representation of the garden.

Justify their inclusion of specific objects in their representation

 

Key competencies

  • Thinking
  • Using language, symbols, and texts
  • Managing self
  • Relating to others
  • Participating and contributing

Cross-curricular links

Visual Arts

Useful resources

PDFs

  Dunedin Chinese Garden – East meet West..pdf  249 kB

  A Synopsis of the Culture of Chinese Gardens..pdf  284 kB

  Dunedin Chinese Garden, Facts & Figures..pdf  776 kB

Websites

Please be aware that, as Wikipedia is a public document, accuracy of information cannot be guaranteed.

Books

  • Lan Yuan – The Garden of Enlightenment edited by James Beattie.

Acknowledgements

  • Dunedin City Council
  • Sara Sinclair, Education Officer, Dunedin Early Settlers Museum
  • Siew Gek, Manager, Dunedin Chinese Gardens
  • Adrian Thein, Octa
  • Malcolm Wong
  • Dunedin Chinese Gardens Trust

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